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Your camping holiday on the pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostela

Camping on the Camino de Santiago

The Camino de Santiago is regarded today as one of the greatest Christian pilgrimage routes in the world. The many different routes, all of which lead to Santiago de Compostela in Spain, are all listed as World Heritage Sites by UNESCO. The French pilgrimage routes to Santiago de Compostela crisscross the country, leading to Spain and the famous tomb of the apostle in Santiago.

So, with Flower Campings, you can easily find a pitch or holiday rental near the pilgrimage routes to Santiago de Compostela.

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The different routes to Santiago de Compostela

You're sure to find a Flower Campings campsite very close to the Camino de Santiago, ready to welcome you for your camping holiday on the pilgrimage route. From France, there are four main departure points.

The Via Turonensis starts in Paris and splits into two branches shortly afterwards, letting pilgrims choose to go via Chartres or Orléans before ending up in Tours. Here the two paths join together again, leading to a single route to the Pyrenees.

From Vézelay, the Via Lemovicensis is the longest of all the routes to Santiago de Compostela. From Burgundy to the Midi-Pyrénées via the Auvergne, this option allows you to meet up with pilgrims from the other stages at Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port in the Basque Country.

From Le Puy-en-Velay, take the Via Podiensis. The route starts in the volcanic soil of the Velay and in the Gévaudan country. It then continues on the high plateaus of the Aubrac and continues through the Lot valley, into the Causses de Quercy, then towards the southwest and the Pyrenees.

From the foot of the Larzac plateau, the Via Tolosale climbs through the Haut-Languedoc Regional Natural Park and runs along the Canal du Midi to Toulouse. It then crosses the agricultural region of Gers before going up the Aspe Valley in the Pyrenees to the Col du Somport.

Find the answer to your questions
Find the answer to your questions

If you need information for your next stay, this is the place to look! Take a look at our frequently asked questions - the answer is bound to be there.

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